Even a 14-Year-Ol​d Knows It’s Time to Buy

Willow Tufano is a 14 year old who lives in Florida. One thing that differentiates her from her friends is that she just bought her first house, a rental property. She bought it with her mother, but anted up her fair share with money she saved for over a year by selling free items she had previously found and fixed up.

The area was hard hit by the housing crisis and Willow and her mother were able to buy the home which was once valued at $100,000 for just $12,000. Why would a 14 year old even consider buying a property?

She is using her half of the rent they charge ($700) to pay back her mom for the second half of the house and the renovations they put into the house. Willow says she’ll have it all paid off in six years. Then she’ll keep the house as a source of income.

“It was definitely a lot of inspiration from my mom and my grandma,” Tufano said. Her mom is a successful real estate agent who owns several investment properties.

Do Appraisers Use Distressed Properties as Comparables?

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This is a major issue real estate industry professionals are dealing with in this tumultuous market. In general, people want the most cash for their home that they can get. If they get a full price offer, that is fantastic, but the problem is that most of these homes are appraising for much less than the agreed price. This complicates the deal and could possibly terminate it all together. If appraisers are using distressed properties for appraisals (which they definitely are), it can change the price dynamics of the market. Below is a great article provided exclusively by kcmblog.com

Many of our readers ask us if appraisers use distressed properties (short sales and foreclosures) as comparables when doing an appraisal on non-distressed properties. We have posted on this issue on several occasions (examples: here and here). Last month, the Appraisal Instituteissued a paper on the subject. In the paper, the Institute explained that:

“Foreclosures and short sales can provide important information for appraisers, who develop valuations based on market data and market forces.”

On whether an appraiser should use distressed properties as comparables, the Institute was very direct (all items in bold were shown as bold in the original paper):

“An appraiser should not ignore foreclosure sales and short sales if consideration of such sales is necessary to develop a credible value opinion.”

And they explained the possible differences between short sales and foreclosures:

“A short sale … might have involved atypical seller motivations and so might not be an ideal comp…

A sale of a bank-owned property might have involved typical motivations, so the fact that it was a foreclosed property would not render it ineligible as a comp.”

Bottom Line

Some will argue that distressed properties should not be used when appraising non-distressed properties. However, there is no longer any doubt that they will be.